Health and Parenting
A child with a cochlear implant does language exercises with an audiologist.

Are cochlear implants an option for my child?

By providing access to sound, cochlear implants have made it possible for children with severe to profound hearing loss to communicate through speech. The devices transmit signals from external processors to the brain via units implanted underneath the skin and small wires connected to the inner ear. “Cochlear implants can be life changing for a ... Read More about Are cochlear implants an option for my child?
Research
A person with pain hotspots with an immune cell and neuron in dialog.

A deeper understanding of inflammatory pain could reveal new solutions

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen are the main go-to for inflammatory pain caused by wounds, infection, sunburn, arthritis, and other triggers. NSAIDs work pretty well, but chronic use can cause side effects, and they aren’t equally effective for all sources of pain. Could we identify a more effective, safer analgesic that doesn’t involve ... Read More about A deeper understanding of inflammatory pain could reveal new solutions
Patient Stories
A baby asleep on a man's shoulder

A seat at the table: One family’s story of finding advanced care for hydrocephalus

To her parents, everything about 6-month-old Stella is a miracle. Rose and Vlad were ecstatic to learn they were expecting a baby after Rose was diagnosed with uterine fibroids. When Stella arrived months early, they were astounded by her ability to keep growing stronger. And when her doctors discovered a buildup of cerebral spinal fluid ... Read More about A seat at the table: One family’s story of finding advanced care for hydrocephalus
Patient Stories
Harven smiles and holds a Sesame Street toy

‘Supported and heard’: Harven gets care for an anorectal malformation

Like lots of 3-year-olds, Harven Gifford has a great imagination. Lately, he’s taken to roaring loudly and pretending that he’s a lion. But it wasn’t long ago that his parents, Heather and Brian, had to be Harven’s voice, when an unexpected health concern turned them into strong advocates for their son. Although Harven’s delivery went ... Read More about ‘Supported and heard’: Harven gets care for an anorectal malformation
Patient Stories
Siena Tancredi stands in front of a window.

Healing the heart, mind, and spirit

For most of her life, Siena Tancredi worried about her heart beating too fast.  She has long QT syndrome, an inherited condition that affects the heart’s electrical rhythm and can cause fast, erratic heartbeats. From the time she was diagnosed at age 10 and into adulthood, she avoided any situation that would potentially cause her heart ... Read More about Healing the heart, mind, and spirit
Research
A brain with hotspots highlighted, with squiggles suggesting seizures.

Can we prevent seizures in Sturge-Weber syndrome?

Port wine stains — capillary malformations on the skin — are the most visible manifestation of Sturge-Weber syndrome. However, up to 60 percent of babies with birthmarks in high-risk locations (forehead and upper eyelid) also have capillary malformations in their brain. Of these, 75 to 90 percent will experience a seizure before the age of 2, ... Read More about Can we prevent seizures in Sturge-Weber syndrome?
Patient Stories
A smiling young girls sitting on the ground.

Helping Jasmine manage Sturge-Weber syndrome before symptoms start

Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare neurovascular disorder that increases the risk of seizures in infants due to abnormal blood vessel development in the brain. Almost 90 percent of children with Sturge-Weber experience their first seizure before age 2, which makes proactive, seizure-preventive care important in minimizing the risk of long-term brain injury. Finding such care, ... Read More about Helping Jasmine manage Sturge-Weber syndrome before symptoms start
Clinical Care
A clinician holding a patient’s hand

Reversing the trend: Easing the mental health boarding crisis in emergency rooms

Anxiety, depression, and suicide attempts have been rising over the past decade, especially among teens, often landing them in emergency departments (EDs). Due to a nationwide shortage of beds in psychiatric treatment programs, virtually all pediatric hospitals are having to keep patients in the ED and on inpatient medical and surgical floors — sometimes for ... Read More about Reversing the trend: Easing the mental health boarding crisis in emergency rooms
Research
A drawing of a heart with several mitochondria.

Mitochondrial transfer restores heart muscle — but how?

Transferring mitochondria from a patient’s healthy skeletal muscle to damaged, ischemic heart tissue has been shown to restore heart muscle, increase energy production, and improve ventricular function. After pioneering preclinical work by James McCully, PhD, at Boston Children’s Hospital about a decade ago, cardiac surgeons led by Sitaram Emani, MD, have been testing it as ... Read More about Mitochondrial transfer restores heart muscle — but how?
Research
An illustration of the lungs points to pulmonary remodeling at the cellular level.

Study suggests hypoxia overexpression causes pericytes to contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Pericytes, the multifunctional cells that work within the walls of capillaries, have been a subject of focus in the study of vascular development, cerebral blood flow, cancer, and neurodevelopment diseases. But pericytes hadn’t been truly studied for their potential role in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) until they landed under the microscopes of Boston Children’s researchers. They recently ... Read More about Study suggests hypoxia overexpression causes pericytes to contribute to pulmonary hypertension